PCTA Logo
Mount Hood Chapter
Pacific Crest Trail Association
The mission of the Pacific Crest Trail Association is to protect, preserve and promote the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as a world-class experience for hikers and equestrians, and for all the values provided by wild and scenic lands.
PCT Logo

Volunteering
Email List
FAQ
Directions
The Trail
Photo Gallery
Mileage Summary
Elevation Profile
Trail Conditions
Caretakers
Post Reports
TCPs
Other Forms
Section Maps
Caretaker Sections
Agency Contacts
Other Links
Meeting Minutes
Past Reports
Reconstruction Projects
Policy Statements
Grant's Getaways
Web Cams
Mount Saint Helens
Cascade Locks
Timberline Lodge
Government Camp
Wapinitia Pass
Partners
PCTA
USFS Region 6
Columbia Gorge NSA
Mount Hood NF
Gifford Pinchot NF
Washington DNR

History of the Mount Hood Area

1993

150 volunteer hours.

Two trail maintenance projects were performed in southern Washington:

  • Wind River Ranger District (1)
  • Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area (1)

Leader was:

  • Roger Carpenter (2)

Steve Queen was appointed Oregon Regional Coordinator by the PCTA. Brian Booth (Washington Regional Coordinator) and Steve divided their regions into districts and assigned district coordinators. (After 1993, the position of district coordinator was adopted by the PCTA, but the name was changed to area coordinator so as not to confuse terminology with forest service ranger districts.)

Steve Queen resigned as Oregon Regional Coordinator and became the Mount Hood District Coordinator so that he could focus on getting work done on the ground. The Mount Hood Chapter of the PCTA was established and its first meeting was held at Oregon Sports Offices - West in November.

Mount Hood Sign Plan - Phase 2. The Mount Hood National Forest used the sign plan to order signs.

1992

??? volunteer hours.

Mount Hood Sign Plan - Phase 1. Lesya Struz coordinated volunteers to compile a sign inventory. Based on this information as well as another sign inventory performed by the USFS, Ken White created the Mount Hood Sign Plan and a document identifying signing standards for the PCT. In theory, this sign plan was to be adopted by all forests along the entire length of the PCT.